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Would the following question be within the scope of the site?

I've been struggling to find a listing for the rules that determine the effective permissions of a user on a database object in SQL Server based on the GRANTs, REVOKEs, and DENYs, that are explicitely applied to the user or/and the roles they blong to. For instance, one rule would be that DENY takes precedence over all the the GRANTs that were either explicitly applied or inherited, but can be cancelled by an inherited or explicitely applied REVOKE.

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  • I’m voting to close this question because OP doesn't want an actual answer on how to ask good questions. Just looking for a brawl based on (unfriendly) comments.
    – John K. N.
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 19:19
  • What makes you think that I don't want an "actual" answer, or that I'm just looking for a "brawl"? The claim that I was "unfriendly", if it was true, does not entail either of those statements of yours. Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

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What you have quoted doesn't appear to be a question; it looks like a statement, so it's unclear what is being asked.

If it were phrased as an answerable question, showing some research effort and referencing the relevant documentation or other sources, it would likely be well within the site scope.

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  • The implied question asks about a listing of the rules that determine the effective permissions of a user on a database object in SQL Server... When someone expresses a difficulty with performing a certain task in a QA site, it's clear that they're asking for a way to perform that same task. Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 1:43
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This is more complicated than a yes/no question. Rather than addressing your exact question about the post being "within the scope of the site", let me explain why the post would not be "well received on the site." In this case, the topic is "within scope," but the post itself is likely to be closed because it does not contain a specific question.

Implied questions aren't real questions. They except the person answering to assume certain aspects of the statement which may or may not be of relevance.

Implied questions are somewhat open-ended and do not focus on a single issue. They are hard to answer, because of the unspecific wording of the question.

If you were instead of stating:

I've been struggling to find a listing for the rules that determine the effective permissions of a user on a database object in SQL Server based on the GRANTs, REVOKEs, and DENYs, that are explicitely applied to the user or/and the roles they blong to.

...to ask:

Is there a way to produce a list of objects a user can access:

  • based on the GRANT and DENY a user has received?
  • based on the roles the user has been assigned to?
  • based on the server roles the SQL Login has been assigned to?

...then you might possibly receive an answer.

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  • What do you mean they are not real? There is the post, and there is the quesiton that it implies, which is real. Even when the question is explicit the person answering still has to make some assumptions. Evidently, the goal is to minimize the number of statements the reader has to assume in order to properly answer the question. My point was that making my question grammatically explicit won't result in a decrease of the number of assumptions one has to make. Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 14:46
  • Also, there is no evidence that I might have received an answer if I changed the format of the post to the one you are suggesting. Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 14:49
  • Yes, well we can all see where this is leading. You want advice, but won't take it from people with more understanding of what goes on in SQL Server. So it seems like you don't actually want advice on how to ask a good question, but somebody who says YES to your above question. Strange logic, sorry.
    – John K. N.
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 19:18
  • I'd actually accept a NO to my question. I'm just calling BS on your pretending not to understand what the question is. Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 20:09
  • @Mehdi I think the "No" is implied.
    – AMtwo
    Commented Jun 26, 2023 at 5:45
  • @AMtwo The answers claim that the post contain no underlying question. Saying "No" or implying it would be in contradiction with that claim, since it would acknowledge the existence of the question. Commented Jun 26, 2023 at 8:47
  • I was making a tongue-in-cheek comment that you are insistent that your original question was obvious & implicit. The question of it being "in scope" is actually a nuanced one. The topic is in-scope, and several of the implied questions are in-scope. However, John addresses a slightly different question--"Would this post not well received? If no, why not?" In reading John's reply, I think the "No, it would not be well received" is quite implicit in the way he explains why, and offers alternative, more specific questions to ask. Pedanticism about specifically saying "no" is uncalled for.
    – AMtwo
    Commented Jun 26, 2023 at 19:32
  • I added the first paragraph to John's answer, which I think makes his implication explicit.
    – AMtwo
    Commented Jun 26, 2023 at 19:49

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