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I've checked some questions such as:

And while I can see that database design questions are generally welcome, I have a situation in which there are certain database quirks that are platform-specific, not database-specific. While we have Salesforce Stack Exchange, I think that place is more geared towards platform-specific questions (like UI, platform functionalities and programming).

If you don't know Salesforce yet, it is a huge platform, and one of its features is that you can customize it to the point of creating tables for your cloud (literally naming an object and creating its fields/columns, and creating primary/foreign keys as well).

  • "literally naming an object and creating its fields/columns, and creating primary/foreign keys as well" Is this just for use within sales force or is it generally applicable and available for use outside of any intended use-case? – Evan Carroll Jan 31 '18 at 20:03
  • With that I meant you have an UI just for changing the schema. I don't think other databases have such thing. Of course, it is possible to develop an application for that. The database fields themselves can be used to store most kinds of small (<130k chars) data. The platform is geared towards sales/service/marketing though. – Renato Oliveira Jan 31 '18 at 20:26
  • "UI just for changing the schema" all databases have such a thing: SQL. You have text-only UI's with all of them through the official clients sql-cmd/psql/mysql, etc. And you have graphical web-UIs through things like PgAdmin phpMyAdmin and SSMS. – Evan Carroll Jan 31 '18 at 20:29
  • Text-only UIs are not what I meant. I was thinking more of a UI that is simple enough for a common administrator (not necessarily a programmer) to be able to use. I didn't know phpMyAdmin allowed this, and I've heard of PgAdmin. – Renato Oliveira Jan 31 '18 at 20:34
  • DBeaver is a cross-dbms tool that a lot of people like too. There are tons of them if you want point and click. look around. =) – Evan Carroll Jan 31 '18 at 20:42
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If you don't know Salesforce yet, it is a huge platform, and one of its features is that you can customize it to the point of creating tables for your cloud (literally naming an object and creating its fields/columns, and creating primary/foreign keys as well).

I don't claim to know Salaesforce, but my guess it that the question itself may be on topic but that you won't find the audience for it here.

This site is clearly geared towards infrastructural things, regardless of whether you accomplish them with open and free products like PostgreSQL, or closed and proprietary products like SQL Server. That said, I think you become a user when your choice of tool is crafted for a specific use-case that is narrowly-defined, and that you can't reasonably expand upon.

  • My current doubts are more related to database schemas, I think. But there are limitations that are exclusive to Salesforce's database, for example. I'm thinking the schema part belongs to this site, but the limitations might be difficult to find an answer here. Thank you for your answer. – Renato Oliveira Jan 31 '18 at 20:31

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